Shop More Submit  Join Login
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo
Download JPG 4168 × 2198




Details

Submitted on
August 29, 2012
Image Size
5.0 MB
Resolution
4168×2198
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
8,746 (6 today)
Favourites
137 (who?)
Comments
40
Downloads
772
×
IJN SHINANO by zulumike IJN SHINANO by zulumike
Take the largest battleship hull (Yamato class) and add a steel reinforced flight deck and you have the largest aircraft ever built during WW II. Lesson learned the Japanese Navy realized after Midway that they needed to build more aircraft carriers and not battleships. The Shinano was to be a 3rd battleship of the Yamato class but was changed over to an aircraft carrier after Midway.

IJN Shinano was named after the Shinano province of Japan, this 71,890 ton super battleship (Yamato Class), now converted to the world’s largest aircraft carrier, set sail on her maiden voyage on November 28, 1944, escorted by three destroyers. Her career lasted only (15) day.

With a full-load displacement of 72,000 long tons (73,000 t), Shinano was the largest aircraft carrier ever built, a record she would hold until USS Forrestal with a displacement of 80,000 long tons (81,000 t)—was launched in 1954.

On her way to the safety of the Inland Sea to conduct her sea trials, she was spotted and sunk by the American submarine USS Archer-Fish commanded by Joseph F. Enright, USN.

Link: < href=[link]>shinano
Add a Comment:
 
:iconwagmorebarkless:
WagmoreBarkless Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2014
Excellent!
The angle you chose really shows the Yamato-class hull.  
I love your gallery!  I appreciate the history and analysis you include with many of your paintings.  I salute you!
Reply
:iconzulumike:
zulumike Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for the kind words. I always try to learn something as I approach my artwork and present it based on actual events or historical data. Cheers.
Reply
:iconsotf:
SOTF Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Archerfish's destruction of this behemoth is really hard to believe considering it destroyed the carrier right at the enemy's doorstep. Give or take, Japan had lost all advantage by 1944 but yeah, really hard to believe. XD
Reply
:iconrd-dd1843:
RD-DD1843 Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2014
About twenty years ago I saw the only book in English about the "Shinano".  The Japanese Government was so good at keeping the loss a secret from the public that few people believed this aircraft super carrier was ever actually built and sailed.  As it sank with over 3,000 sailors and pilots lost on it's maiden voyage it bears comparison to RMS Titanic.  Curiously enough Nazi Germany lost three ocean liners fleeing with refugee Germans from Eastern Europe (from the Russians) in January - March 1945: the "Wilhelm Gustloff" (loss over 9,000), the "Genera Steuben" (I believe 6,000), and the "Goya" (I believe 3 500 -  4,000).  All were sunk by Soviet submarines.  The "Gustloff" is the subject of a novel by Gunter Grass.
Reply
:iconzulumike:
zulumike Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I appreciate your info. A good piece of history. Thank You.
Reply
:iconawb2012:
AWB2012 Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2013
HAPPY HAPPY JOY JOY, MORE TARGET PRACTICE, BOYS!! IM GOING IN WITHOUT YA, SEE YOU IN HELL!!!
Reply
:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012
Nice image. Thank goodness the Japanese never figured out the angled flight deck.
Reply
:iconanaspieinpoland:
AnAspieInPoland Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Doubtful it would change anything. Shinano was supposed to be a 'stop-over' point for Japanese aircraft, not an a carrier as a whole. It only job was to provide a landstrip for refueling and rearming, nothing else.
Reply
:iconzulumike:
zulumike Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you, Cheers.
Reply
:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I love IJN Navy! Great ships, disciplined crews... long lance torpedoes! But against American Industry...?
Reply
Add a Comment: